the burning man at sunset - HDR - burning man 2009

the burning man at sunset - HDR - burning man 2009, burning man, clouds, the man, wooden sculpture, wooden truss the burning man at sunset - HDR - burning man 2009, burning man, clouds, the man, wooden sculpture, wooden truss

the burning man at sunset - HDR - burning man 2009

The Man, by Larry Harvey, Rod Garrett.­

In 2009, the Burning Man rises above a 'tangled bank' consisting of irregular wooden triangles.­ No two elements of this organic composition will be quite the same; together they'll create what's best described as a chaotic truss.­

The truss is clearly inspired by the "belgian waffle" installation from 2006.­

This is a HDR (High Dynamic Range) photo processed with Tone Mapping using Photomatix.­ It is based on 3 exposures, with 2 stops between each.­

Photo taken at the Burning Man 2009 festival (Black Rock Desert, Nevada).­

burning man
clouds
the man
wooden sculpture
wooden truss
September 12, 2009
Black Rock City, Nevada, USA
Burning Man 2018 photos

Burning Man Festival

Photos per year: 2016, 2015, 2013, 2012, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 1999, 1998.

Burning Man is yearly gathering of about 70,000 people, many from the San Francisco Bay Area, celebrating love, life, passion and art during one week in a desolated desert in Nevada.­

The event takes place each last week of august in an immense dry lakebed called Black Rock Desert.­ A temporary city is built where about everything is permitted except violence, money and commerce.­

The culmination of the event is the burning of a large human-shape figure in a giant bonfire, hence the name (Burning Man).­ The city disappears completely at the end of the week, leaving no trace.­

If this sounds interesting, check out the official Burning Man website at www.­burningman.­org.

Burning Man 2009 266 photos

Burning Man 2009 photos by Tristan Savatier (email me!)

You can see the photos from other years at www.­loupiote.­com/­burningman

For me, 2009 was a very good harvest for Burning Man Photography.­ I selected twice as many photos as last year in this series.­ I am a bit sad that I missed a few amazing art pieces and magical moments, but i managed to capture more excellent images than in previous years.­

Like the previous years, I was part of the BM photo Team and I was assigned an area of the playa to document.­ But unfortunately I found the art in this area quite uninspiring (visually), and the Theme-Camps in my area where quite hard to capture with photography.­ The "Nectar Village Steam Bath" crew did not want people to take photos in their camp (even though they don't declare it a No-Camera zone) and they were extremely aggressive towards me when I did.­ This was the only bad experience I had for the entire week.­

Because of the windy and dusty conditions this year, I very rarely changed lenses, and I had to clean my sensor once.­ This is why I took almost no photos with a telephoto this year.­ My night /­ fire photos are not stellar because of playa dust inside my fastest lens (between the glass elements).­ But overall, I think this is a great series, and people seem to like it.­

Hi-resolutions photos with no watermark are available for editorial use (contact me).­

For information on this festival and to see my photos from other years, click here.

Photos processed with HDR and "tone mapping", e.­g.­ using Photomatix.­

See also related series: TT-HDR - True Tone High Dynamic Range.

I sometimes do HDR processing from a single RAW exposure, since my camera has about 6-stop dynamic range in RAW mode.­ This is the only possible way when shooting a moving subject.­

For those wondering about the technical part, here is some information about my workflow for producing tone-mapped HDR images from a single RAW exposure:

- The RAW image is used to generate 3 images using exposure compensation with Photoshop using Adobe Camera Raw: -2EV, 0EV and +2EV.­ This allows to capture about the entire dynamic range stored in the RAW file.­ You could also use Lightroom to do that too, or any software than can process those RAW files.­ In my case, I need to first convert the RAW files into DNG format (using the standalone Adobe CameraRaw Converter) because the version of Camera Raw that I can use with my Photoshop is not compatible with the RAW format of my (recent) camera.­ But you don't need to go through the DNG step if you have the latest Adobe software.­

- The 3 images (-2EV, 0EV and +2EV) are then merged into one HDR image using Photomatix (you could also use Photoshop to do that).­ This is basically an automatic process with no parameters to adjust.­

- The HDR image is then processed with Tone Mapping to obtain a displayable image.­ I use Photomatix for the tone mapping.­ There are many knobs that can be adjusted, but in general I use the default setting and I increase the color saturation value in the Tone Mapping dialog.­ I then save the resulting tone-mapped image in TIFF format.­

- I then correct Chromatic Aberrations using the free and automatic Photoshop plugin from Photoacute, which works very well most of the times.­

- I then use standard photoshop layers to do the usual final adjustments (Level, Curve, Saturation, Color Balance).­

If you like these photos, don't hesitate to leave a comment or email me.